After the Worst has Happened

It is the end of my Honours year. I am at a party to celebrate. I am shivering, despite the warm evening as I stand with a group of my classmates on the patio. We are anxiously waiting to hear if the two girls who left the party to go for a walk and did not return, have been found. Someone comes running towards us out of the darkness. He takes a breath, “the worst has happened”, a pause… “they have been raped”.

I have thought of those words many times in the last five years. I have been recalled to them again in the past few weeks as another spate of highly publicised rapes (and murders) infiltrate my consciousness:

RAPE IS THE WORST THING THAT CAN HAPPEN TO A WOMXN

I hear this message echoed in the words of Judge Kgomo as he hands down sentencing to serial rapist Christian Cornelius Julies in the North West. “It is unquestionable that if he was not stopped in his tracks, belatedly though, the devastation of girls and women’s lives would have continued”.

I hear it in the numerous posts on Facebook that recur on my news feed which proclaim that “my biggest fear is being raped”.

I am torn as I write this because it was my biggest fear -so much so that at the moment that I was being dragged into the bushes I thought to myself “oh god this – the worst thing – is finally happening to me”.  But what does it mean for me now? What can I do now that the worst has happened to me?

According to this narrative my life has been devastated, I have been violated in the most extreme way imaginable, I am worse than dead. I have struggled under the weight of this for 18 months now. I have tried to reconstitute myself amidst the constant echo that this is not actually possible – that I will never be whole and unbroken ever again.

I am not denying that being raped is terrifying and terrible. How could I deny this? It was terrifying and terrible – so terrifying and terrible that I left my body for a while and just hovered above myself, trying not to look down on what was happening.

BUT I am concerned about how the dominant narratives about sexual violence, including the one that being raped is the worst thing, impact on the ability to move beyond the terrifying and terribleness of rape.  How is it possible to heal when disclosing an experience of trauma is met with “Oh my goodness! That is my worst fear!”? How are those who have been violated supposed to heal when they are constantly reminded that they have been dehumanised in the most severe way?

I am not suggesting that we should not continue to call out the horror that is sexual violence. All instances of sexual violence are unacceptable and need to be plainly rendered as such.

But I am asking that we think more carefully about how we do this so that we do not reinscribe pain and horror on the bodies, psyches and souls of those around us.

Rebecca Helman 

Rebecca Helman is a PhD candidate at the University of South Africa (UNISA). Her PhD, entitled “post-rape subjectivities”, examines the ways in which rape survivors are able to (re)constitute their subjectivities amidst the discursive and material politics of sexual violence in the South African context. Rebecca is also a volunteer counsellor at Rape Crisis Cape Town Trust’s Observatory office. 

 

 

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3 thoughts on “After the Worst has Happened

  1. Thanks Rebecca. You’re right, we have to stop this “fate worse than death” narrative. Death is worse than rape, obviously — you’d think? Years ago, a RC counsellor told me that she thought it was worse to be battered than raped — rape being an explosion that resets the survivor’s life to Ground Zero — and then you rebuild. Whereas ongoing domestic violence breaks down the fragile rebuilding day after week after month after year… obviously, apples and oranges, but I’ve never forgotten her words. As we grow older, we realise there are worse fates than rape or perhaps even death: the death of a child, loss of self or loved ones to dementia. That probably doesn’t sound very cheering, but maybe something to use to disrupt this “worst thing ever” story when you hear it. The wonderful thing is that with help, we do survive — and we survive with the ability to live rich, fulfilling, satisfying lives. Which becomes the best response in itself. Wishing you well, and everything of the best for the PhD — will look out for your thesis in due course.

  2. Thank you for sharing your story Rebecca, your perspective is so relevant particularly when dealing with rape and sexual assault survivors….and those that believe rape will be the end of life as they know it. May we, as friends, counsellors and family offer the hope of a future that includes healing, “normality” and happiness. Lots of love Michelle

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