A new Rape Crisis campaign hits close to home.

It is estimated that 40% of South African women will be raped in their lifetime and only 8.6% of rape perpetrators are convicted.

Unfortunately, most people believe these rapes only occur in dark alleyways by hooded strangers.

Rape Crisis’ new campaign reveals that the truth is a lot closer to home. 68% of rape survivors know their rapist. They have had their trust broken in the workplace, home, communities, and other places that should very well be a place of safety. They have been betrayed by a friend, husband, family member and colleague.

If women can’t trust those closest to them, who can they trust? Many struggle to speak out about their experiences for fear their trust will be further betrayed.

The harrowing campaign uses radio ads featuring actual survivors, to inform women that if they have no one speak to, they can speak to a trained Rape Crisis counsellor through a dedicated 24hr crisis line. This will also be supported by online film, and a surprising print campaign that communicates the dark secret that 68% of survivors are raped by someone they know.

The campaign was created by Ogilvy Cape Town with the help of Giant Films, We Love Jam and photographer David Prior.

The campaign was created by Ogilvy Cape Town with the help of Giant Films, We Love Jam and photographer David Prior.

Watch the Rape Crisis ad here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IuBwyZkWXP0

Hear the radio spots below:

View the press adverts below:

68% of survivors know their rapist

Photographer David Prior

68% of survivors know their rapist

Photographer David Prior

68% of survivors know their rapist

Photographer David Prior


Rape Crisis Director, Kathleen Dey adds, “We need ordinary people in our communities who may feel helpless listening to this but who can make a difference by donating, if you need help or want to help, please call 021 447 9762, or visit rapecrisis.org.za to donate.” 
All proceeds will go towards our counselling service.

#SpeakToUs

Contact: 021 447 1467
Email: zeenat@rapecrisis.org.za

Credits:

Client:
Rape Crisis
Client Representative: Kathleen Dey
Product: Sexual Abuse Awareness
Title:
The Identikit
Agency:
Ogilvy Cape Town
Chief Creative Officer: Pete Case
Executive Creative Director: Tseliso Rangaka
Associate Executive Creative Director: Nicholas Wittenberg
Creative Director: Mike Martin
Associate Creative Director / Copywriter: Alex Goldberg
Creative Group Head / Art Director: Ryan Barkhuizen
Art Director: Karen Vermeulen
Agency Producer: Cathy Day
Client Service: Chris Spencer, Loren Westoby, Nefeli Valakelis
Production Company:
Giant
Director: Karien Murray
Producer: Laura Sampson
Editing:
Deliverance
Editor: Gordon Ray
Sound Design:
The Workroom
Sound Engineer: Stephen Webster
Post Production: Black Ginger

 

 

 

Advertisements

Just Another Feminist [Valentines] Day

What is feminism?

Feminism is believing in the equality of rights for women on the grounds that they should be equal to men, in every environment – social, political, and economic. Rape Crisis is a feminist organisation, where we empower each other in the best way possible.

What is a feminist Valentines Day?

For feminists Valentine’s Day has some problems. It encourages and enhances damaging gender stereotypes. It celebrates the kind of consumerism that can elevate material things over emotions. It can make people who do not have an intimate partner feel alone and inferior. And for people trapped in violent or abusive relationships it can be a stark reminder of everything that hurts their lives.

But Valentines Day, the 14th of February, doesn’t have to be celebrated in the traditional way. A feminist approach is seeing the 14th of February as a day filled with women’s empowerment, self love, and love for the people close to you and even for people in the wider world. Regardless of this day, you should always do what makes you happy, whether that means ignoring Valentine’s Day or celebrating it.

How can we celebrate this Valentine’s day in a feminist way?

  • Do something to celebrate yourself – something you really enjoy.
  • Celebrate the people close to you in the way you know they would most appreciate – by spending time with them.
  • Fight violence against women, or become more involved with the power of women’s voices. Join the Rape Survivors’ Justice Campaign 
  • Donate to our counselling service and support rape survivors when they need it most.
  • View or download and enjoy these photos:

 

Image Sources: Pinterest

Farhana

Farhana Sarguro – Communications Officer for Rape Crisis and student at AAA School of advertising

Ramaphosa’s SONA and the issue of gender-based violence

Cyril Ramaphosa will have to explain on Thursday how the state will give effect to majority party January 8 statement commitments in the light of a shrinking fiscus.

Gender-based violence made it into the January 8 statement of the majority party. And not just a mention – a relatively thorough and honest assessment of the state of women and girl children in South Africa, and in particular the unprecedented levels of abuse, violence and murder suffered by them. The president said “we must hang our heads in shame” at the state of gender-based violence and the patriarchal practices that give rise to it in the country.

Indeed. He also asked the men in the stadium to stand and make a commitment to end gender-based violence. Contrast this with no mention of gender-based violence at all in last year’s January 8 statement.

The harrowing stories told by survivors at the recent Summit on Gender-Based Violence seem to have persuaded the party to highlight the issue as a national crisis. The women who took to the streets for #totalshutdown can legitimately claim the summit as a success, and it is very pleasing to see a rhetorical commitment to ending the scourge.

But when the president promised that “the ANC government will continue to scale up the network of Thuthuzela Care Centres and other victim empowerment initiatives” I really started paying attention.

Thuthuzela Care Centres are one-stop facilities, aimed at preventing secondary victimisation of rape and abuse victims, improving conviction rates, and reducing the time taken to finalise cases. There are 55 Thuthuzela Care Centres across the country.

The care centres are proving an antidote to the general level of non-reporting of sexual offences. Rape Crisis Cape Town Trust compared the patterns of reporting at three local Thuthuzela Care Centres that it recorded in Cape Town.

  • In 2014 there were 2,628 cases.
  • In 2015 there were 3,153 cases.
  • In 2016 there were 3,210 cases.
  • In 2017 there were 3,425 cases.

These increases match a decrease in reporting to local police stations. It makes sense – at most care centres counsellors inform the survivor about the complex processes involved in reporting rape: a nurse will counsel the survivor about potential health risks, including potential HIV infection, and prepare them for the forensic examination, which is conducted by a doctor specially trained to collect forensic evidence for the crimes of rape and sexual assault. After this examination, the first responder gives the survivor a care pack containing toiletries so that she can shower, change into clean underwear and brush her teeth.

A police detective takes a statement immediately or escorts the survivor to their home and makes an arrangement to take the statement the next day.

In some care centres, they work with or near a sexual offences court, which provides specialist infrastructure, personnel and services to survivors.

Donors have funded the care centres for some time. This funding will end on the 31st March 2019.

In recent research produced for the AIDS Foundation of South Africa and the Networking HIV & AIDS Community of Southern Africa, they highlight the ending of the Global Fund grant funding for the care centres. “The extensive funding provided the Global Fund to almost all care centres across the country raises concern around the care centres ability to effectively implement the provision of psychosocial services without support from other donors.”

All Thuthuzela Care Centre stakeholders interviewed thought that the ending of this tranche Global Fund grant funding on 31 March 2019 would have dire consequences for the services currently being offered. The withdrawal of Global Fund grant funding at the care centres may result in the loss of a number of NGO services.

So where will the funds come from to sustain the care centres? The president will have to explain how the state will give effect to majority party commitments, in the light of a shrinking fiscus.

Alison Tilley is the head of advocacy and special projects at the Open Democracy Advice Centre.

Why people make a difference to the experience of survivors

Previously we wrote about the space created for discussion as we partnered with the University of Cape Town’s Centre for Law and Society to host a panel discussion on developing court models in South Africa. However, it was not only the space that we were grateful for, but also the content of the discussion.

As the three researchers, Lisa Vetten, Dr Aisling Heath, and Karen Hollely, shared some key findings from their work and presented their opinions to the people that attended, there was a very clear golden thread tying together their findings: people. When victims of sexual offences were interviewed during research conducted by the Child Witness Institute, it was clear that people’s experience of the criminal justice system and sexual offences court depends on the people that work in the court and how supportive they are. This was the same for when magistrates and prosecutors were interviewed about working in sexual offences courts – justice is dispensed by people and who those people are, matter greatly.

As survivors experience the criminal justice system, they experience people. The prosecutor who interviews them and who leads their testimony. The interpreter translating their testimony. The magistrate acting as the presiding officer. And the court supporter, holding the survivor through the process. Clearly the criminal justice system is not some far away “system” devoid of human interaction.
Clearly the criminal justice system IS people.

The question then is how do we make sure that we have the right people who will not only limit secondary trauma suffered by the survivor, but will also ensure that justice is served and that perpetrators are convicted? Fortunately, research (like what was presented at this panel discussion) can provide enormous help in this regard and the Rape Survivors’ Justice Campaign uses this information when lobbying government for the rollout of sexual offences courts.

We are currently lobbying the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development to finalise the Regulations for Sexual Offences Courts. The regulations provide the minimum requirements for a sexual offences court to exist, including the people that should work at such a court. One of the issues that we lobbied for, is the inclusion of court supporters in the requirements for sexual offences court. We hear what researchers say about the importance of the right people providing support to survivors in the criminal justice system and we could use this information to lobby for specialised court supporters provided by Non-Profit Organisations and funded by the Department of Social Development. Although the regulations have not been finalised, we are very positive that specialised court supporters will be included.

The powerful thing about research then, is when words come to life. When research is used to make real-life changes in legislation and people’s experience of courts, that is when we know positive change is happening.

alexasedge_staff_03-002-e1494597011635

 

 

Jeanne Bodenstein is the coordinator of the Rape Survivors’ Justice Campaign for the Rape Crisis Cape Town Trust.