National Wills Week in September

The Law Society of South Africa will host National Wills Week from 11 to 15 September 2017. During this week participating attorneys will draft basic wills free of charge. You can read more about this and find all participating attorneys by clicking here. By making a Will you ensure that your assets are disposed of in accordance with your wishes after your death.

A qualified attorney can advise you on any problems which may arise with regard to your will and ensure that your will is valid and complies with your wishes. If you die without leaving a valid will, your assets may not be left to the person of your choice, it might take a long time to appoint an executor and there may be extra costs. There can be unhappiness and conflict among members of your family because there are no clear instructions on how to distribute your assets.

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Leaving a legacy

Bequests and legacies provide an important income stream for many charities. A Will is the best way to safeguard the future of the causes important to you. When you make a bequest in your Will, you make a difference. A difference to a worthwhile charity and a difference to people in need. One of the most important things our generation can do is provide the means to ensure Rape Crisis is around to continue serving the thousands of rape survivors attended to every year.

Fortunately, leaving a bequest is easy. What’s more, just a relatively small donation from your overall estate could make all the difference to the survivors in need.

Please click here to download the codicil to be filled out and attached to your will.

Let’s all work together to ensure a brighter future for the thousands of rape survivors we help every year. If you would like more information or to talk to us about this, please contact Kathleen Dey at kath@rapecrisis.org.za. To make an ordinary donation click here. Please pass on this information to anyone you think may want to leave a legacy for survivors.

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The difference that a care pack makes

By Shiralee Mc Donald

We would like to extend our gratitude to everyone who responded to our call for care packs for survivors accessing services at the Thuthuzela Care Centers over the holiday season. We felt truly touched and surprised that our ‘wish-list’ was fulfilled to the extent that it was. The first thing one is offered after any type of shock or trauma is a sweet drink yet this is the very last thing that survivors are able to do as it would destroy evidence. So having a snack and juice in the care packs was appreciated because the process can take a number of hours, sugar levels drop and survivors are hungry after the wait.

A donor remarked at the injustice of a child receiving this type of gift at Christmas compared to what her children were expecting. So true and it is very sad that so many children in our communities are sexually abused. What we can say for sure is that because of these care packs, children were able to hold on to something to distract themselves from the trauma of the examination. Counsellors at the Thuthuzela Care Centers spirits were lifted by the fact that there are community members who care that survivors would go home after their forensic examination with a sense of dignity that others thought about their needs during this time. We felt privileged to meet the women and men who felt strongly that they wanted to do something and would like to thank them for all their efforts.

Please remember that there is always a need for care packs and if you are interested in donating please contact Helette at the Observatory Office for more details: 021 447 1467