Activist Training – Applications Now Open at Rape Crisis

The Rape Crisis Cape Town Trust has a 40 year history of training activists to bring about change in the way we deal with rape in our society. The need for radical change in our country is still as strong as ever but there is not a lot of training for individuals or groups on how to bring about this kind of deep sustainable transformation.

Over the years Rape Crisis has trained counsellors, community educators and activists from the communities we serve in the hope of leaving a legacy that strengthens and empowers the women of these communities to respond to rape and to stand up for their rights.

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The Rape Survivors’ Justice Campaign was launched in 2016. (Pic: Alexa Sedge)

Change at the community level is not enough. Rates of rape in South Africa are very high. We grew up with a culture of violence where violence was part and of everyday life. The system we grew up in is a system that allows violence to go on unchecked. In particular the criminal justice system, which does not recognise the needs to rape survivors in bringing rapists to justice. That is why Rape Crisis launched the Rape Survivors’ Justice Campaign in 2016 to persuade and pressurise government to roll out specialised sexual offences courts across South Africa. We believe that this will strengthen the criminal justice system as a way of addressing high rates of rape in our country.

Do you want to develop or strengthen your own political consciousness?  Do you want to make a difference beyond individual change? Become an activist by joining our training and becoming a volunteer for Rape Crisis.

We are about to embark on a new training programme for community activists who would like to build their organising skills and abilities. Our course deals with the political aspects of rape in South Africa and trains people to organise and lobby for change.

We are looking for a diverse group of participants so whether you come from the communities we serve and are based in or whether you live outside of these communities, we encourage you to apply. If you are actively involved, either in your own community or on social media, and you care about violence against women then this is course is for you. We are looking for people with a wide range of skills and abilities but if you think you have leadership skills and like to organise people and events then this will be an advantage. We are looking for volunteers who are reasonably literate and self-confident and who are critical thinkers. By the end of the course our advocacy volunteers should be able to engage with and persuade groups of people, be able to take initiative and plan well and be able to work in a team.

To get your application form and for more information, please contact our advocacy coordinator, Jeanne Bodenstein at jeanne@rapecrisis.org.za  or call her on 021 447 1467 from Monday – Friday between 9:30am and 4pm. Applications close on 12 May 2017.

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Campaign booklets. (Pic: Alexa Sedge)

The three month series of training workshops that make up the first part of the course will take place in Observatory during the day on a Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday but starting and ending off on a Saturday, starting Saturday 27 May 2017. This will be followed by six months of practical on the job training. Although the training is not SAQA or SETA accredited at this stage, assessment takes place throughout the full process of the training course after which participants will be requested to complete a written examination before graduating.

Who should apply?

  • People 18 years and older
  • From the areas of Athlone, Khayelitsha and Cape Town
  • People who are currently unemployed, doing casual work or students;
  • People who are available to volunteer during the day.
  • Be able to speak English

Expectations of Volunteers:

We expect volunteers to be able to commit to a minimum of eight hours of your free time per month after the workshop series is over in order to participate in advocacy activities, and to attend focus group meetings and buddy group meetings once a month. Volunteers will also be invited to attend volunteer forum meetings and general meetings of the broader organisation four times a year in total.

Course fees:

The cost of the course is R4 000 with a non-refundable registration fee of R1 500. Payment options can be negotiated so the course fee should not be something that stops you from applying.

We look forward to hearing from you.

 

Stop the Bus to End Violence Against Women

The 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s were decades of fear and civil unrest in the Dominican Republic. Rafael Trujillo, the unelected military strongman and President of the nation, orchestrated a reign of terror through a government sponsored genocide, and suppression of civil liberties. Many political dissidents kept quiet for fear of incarceration, torture, or death, but four powerful, and brave sisters, undeterred by the harsh restrictions on political demonstrations, fought on against the ruthless dictator. Through their courageous action, the Mirabal Sisters won the support of their nation’s people and began a social and political movement to collectively dismantle the regime’s power. Recognizing the threat the sisters posed to his authority, Trujillo had them assassinated on 25 November 1960 but rather than eliminating the sisters’ influence, he unknowingly made them heroes and martyrs of the people. In honor of the Mirabal Sisters, the general population began demonstrating in larger numbers and more often, which quickened the end to the bloodiest period in the Dominican Republic’s history.

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Thirty-nine years after the assassination of the Mirabal Sisters the United Nations General Assembly voted to designate 25 November as the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women in the sisters’ honor. The day marks the beginning of the 16 Days of Activism, a period of awareness raising campaigns about the negative impact of violence against women and children, and the need for greater support for survivors of abuse. During the 16 Days individuals are encouraged to show their support for the movement by wearing a white ribbon, a symbol of peace, volunteering for or donating to NGOs that offer support for survivors of abuse, and speaking out against gender and age-based violence. The 16 Days of Activism concludes on 10 December, International Human Rights Day, which celebrates the United Nations General Assembly’s adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948.

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In 2013 the Rape Crisis Cape Town Trust will be commemorating the 16 Days of Activism with our Stop the Bus Campaign. A crew of nine, which includes one counsellor, three community educators, one research fieldworker, one Rape Crisis staff member, two interns from York University in the United Kingdon and a driver, will set off from the Rape Crisis office in Athlone on 24 November and return on 2 December 2013. This year the Stop the Bus crew will stop in Bredasdorp, home of the late Anene Booysen, Swellendam and Barrydale. They will meet with community members, rape survivors and community leaders to discuss the gaps within the Criminal Justice System, the rights survivors have within the Criminal Justice System and the resources and services available to rape survivors in the area. The crew will also assess police, health, and court facilities along the route for their compliance with sexual offences legislation and ability to effectively deliver services to rape survivors.

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To follow the Stop the Bus Campaign’s progress, please check the Rape Crisis Blog for daily updates from the Bus bloggers.

Organisations and community members that wish to participate can contact the Stop the Bus coordinator Barbara Williams (barbara@rapecrisis.org.za) for more information.