A new Rape Crisis campaign hits close to home.

It is estimated that 40% of South African women will be raped in their lifetime and only 8.6% of rape perpetrators are convicted.

Unfortunately, most people believe these rapes only occur in dark alleyways by hooded strangers.

Rape Crisis’ new campaign reveals that the truth is a lot closer to home. 68% of rape survivors know their rapist. They have had their trust broken in the workplace, home, communities, and other places that should very well be a place of safety. They have been betrayed by a friend, husband, family member and colleague.

If women can’t trust those closest to them, who can they trust? Many struggle to speak out about their experiences for fear their trust will be further betrayed.

The harrowing campaign uses radio ads featuring actual survivors, to inform women that if they have no one speak to, they can speak to a trained Rape Crisis counsellor through a dedicated 24hr crisis line. This will also be supported by online film, and a surprising print campaign that communicates the dark secret that 68% of survivors are raped by someone they know.

The campaign was created by Ogilvy Cape Town with the help of Giant Films, We Love Jam and photographer David Prior.

The campaign was created by Ogilvy Cape Town with the help of Giant Films, We Love Jam and photographer David Prior.

Watch the Rape Crisis ad here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IuBwyZkWXP0

Hear the radio spots below:

View the press adverts below:

68% of survivors know their rapist

Photographer David Prior

68% of survivors know their rapist

Photographer David Prior

68% of survivors know their rapist

Photographer David Prior


Rape Crisis Director, Kathleen Dey adds, “We need ordinary people in our communities who may feel helpless listening to this but who can make a difference by donating, if you need help or want to help, please call 021 447 9762, or visit rapecrisis.org.za to donate.” 
All proceeds will go towards our counselling service.

#SpeakToUs

Contact: 021 447 1467
Email: zeenat@rapecrisis.org.za

Credits:

Client:
Rape Crisis
Client Representative: Kathleen Dey
Product: Sexual Abuse Awareness
Title:
The Identikit
Agency:
Ogilvy Cape Town
Chief Creative Officer: Pete Case
Executive Creative Director: Tseliso Rangaka
Associate Executive Creative Director: Nicholas Wittenberg
Creative Director: Mike Martin
Associate Creative Director / Copywriter: Alex Goldberg
Creative Group Head / Art Director: Ryan Barkhuizen
Art Director: Karen Vermeulen
Agency Producer: Cathy Day
Client Service: Chris Spencer, Loren Westoby, Nefeli Valakelis
Production Company:
Giant
Director: Karien Murray
Producer: Laura Sampson
Editing:
Deliverance
Editor: Gordon Ray
Sound Design:
The Workroom
Sound Engineer: Stephen Webster
Post Production: Black Ginger

 

 

 

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Just Another Feminist [Valentines] Day

What is feminism?

Feminism is believing in the equality of rights for women on the grounds that they should be equal to men, in every environment – social, political, and economic. Rape Crisis is a feminist organisation, where we empower each other in the best way possible.

What is a feminist Valentines Day?

For feminists Valentine’s Day has some problems. It encourages and enhances damaging gender stereotypes. It celebrates the kind of consumerism that can elevate material things over emotions. It can make people who do not have an intimate partner feel alone and inferior. And for people trapped in violent or abusive relationships it can be a stark reminder of everything that hurts their lives.

But Valentines Day, the 14th of February, doesn’t have to be celebrated in the traditional way. A feminist approach is seeing the 14th of February as a day filled with women’s empowerment, self love, and love for the people close to you and even for people in the wider world. Regardless of this day, you should always do what makes you happy, whether that means ignoring Valentine’s Day or celebrating it.

How can we celebrate this Valentine’s day in a feminist way?

  • Do something to celebrate yourself – something you really enjoy.
  • Celebrate the people close to you in the way you know they would most appreciate – by spending time with them.
  • Fight violence against women, or become more involved with the power of women’s voices. Join the Rape Survivors’ Justice Campaign 
  • Donate to our counselling service and support rape survivors when they need it most.
  • View or download and enjoy these photos:

 

Image Sources: Pinterest

Farhana

Farhana Sarguro – Communications Officer for Rape Crisis and student at AAA School of advertising

How to Write About Rape

Writing about rape. Where do you start?

Such a sensitive topic, so prevalent in our society today. It is therefore so important to write about it, so that we can broaden people’s awareness about rape. We want to write about rape because we want our words, stories and theories to change into actions and understandings. But how do you write about such a painful topic without over-sensitising or re-traumatising people and still putting rape survivor’s everyday lived experiences on the foreground? With this question in mind, I went to the Writing about Rape Workshop, organised by the Rape Crisis Cape Town Trust.

I first and foremost have to say, that it was just amazing to be in a safe space, with all like-minded women, that all came to the workshop with the same questions. Nothing is more empowering than a group of women coming together with an open attitude to listen to each other, and all with the same goal in mind; writing about rape to change understandings and actions about sexual violence. And of course, the glasses of wine and the good food, also added to a satisfying learning environment.

The writing workshop mainly focused on our head, heart, and hands. Writing with your head, stands for writing facts, the objective knowledge that you have found about the topic. Writing with you heart, stands for reaching to the reader’s feelings; how can you trigger the reader’s emotions with your words? Lastly, writing with your hands stands for put forward the question ‘what is next?’. How do your words lead to people to wanting to roll up their sleeves and start actively engaging with the topic? In a successful story about rape, one should thus focus on reflecting on facts, emphasising emotions, and triggering actions as an outcome of the story.

These guidelines are of course a helpful toolkit for writing about sexual violence but writing about rape of course remains complicated. At the end of the workshop, an interesting discussion arouse with several intriguing questions that show how important it is for this conversation to be continued. One of the main questions was whether it is possible for feminist writers to remain objective. How can we write about rape, without having an activist agenda? Why is it even necessary for feminist writers to be objective, or to be non-activist? If our goal is to create societal changes towards understandings of rape, isn’t writing about it then inherently an activist act?  Furthermore, when writing about rape, who owns the story? Is it the story of the writer/journalist, or the story of the rape survivor that are brought to light? How do we make sure these personal stories of rape survivors about their everyday experiences are portrayed in a responsible way?

Many reasons thus to continue the conversation on how to write about rape. I am therefore very much looking forward to the next workshop to reflect on their questions. I want to finish this blog with an important concluding message for female writers, shared by another participant of the workshop: if we as writers have the power of picking up the pen, it is our responsibility to focus on the issues that are attacking all women, and we can give an inclusive microphone to those voices that need to be heard. These voices are not put forward by those writers who dominate the writing space now. So, let’s write to take a position in that space. Let’s write from the heart, for all women.

Photos from the event:

 

 

 

By Paula Vermuë

Paula Vermue is an Anthropology student from the Netherlands, who is currently doing research in Cape Town for her research master’s thesis. She has joined the Rape Crisis team as an intern in September 2018.

Helpline & Emergency Numbers

We have put together a list of referral numbers, including national Thuthuzela Care Center’s and national emergency numbers should you wish to contact them. Although it is the festive season, the listed organisations are always here for you and those is need of support. The lists can be found below or downloaded for your disposal.

This is a list of all the Thuthuzela Care Centres (TCCs) in the Country.  Not all TCC’s operate in the same way as Heideveld and Karl Bremer in that not all of them have counsellors on 24/7 shifts.   When in doubt about where to refer someone to, i.e., you can’t find an appropriate referral in the rest of the referral file, you can put the client in touch with the TCC in their area and they should be able to give the client an appropriate referral.

Remember, if you can’t speak to anyone, speak to us.

DOWNLOAD / VIEW PDF’s HERE:

National TCC Referrals

Helpline Numbers 

48404938_1621326824633515_8787209006910275584_n