Joining communities fighting violence against women

The 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence is an international campaign to challenge violence against women and children. The campaign runs every year from 25 November, the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, to 10 December, Human Rights Day. It was started in 1991 by the first Women’s Global Leadership Institute and in 1998 South Africa joined the campaign.

These 16 days encourage all people living in South Africa and other participating countries to speak out and call for the prevention and elimination of violence against women and children.

#HearMeToo is the theme for this year’s United Nations International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women and one of the goals is to highlight and show support for activists and organisations that fight against the abuse of women and children. This year the Rape Crisis Cape Town Trust will highlight some of the many organisations that we work with who work to improve the safety and rights of women and children in South Africa every day.

To all of those who fight to protect the rights of women and children, defend and protect them and care for victims and survivors, across South Africa and around the world, we salute you.

  1. The Shukumisa Coalition

The Shukumisa Coalition is made up of more than 75  organisations across South Africa including NGOs research institutions, law and policy organisations and community-based organisations that work together to ensure that the Sexual Offences and Related Matters Act (Sexual Offences Act) is implemented, that the South African Government honours its obligation to put the right measures in place to address sexual violence and that these are equitable across the whole country.  Part of the Coalition’s work is to ensure that South Africa has well crafted, well implemented laws and policies in place that are developed through broad-based public participation processes in which women play a key role.

Website: http://shukumisa.org.za/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Shukumisa

Twitter: @shukumisa

  1. The Women’s Legal Centre

The Women’s Legal Centre (WLC) is a non-profit law centre that seeks to achieve equality for women, particularly black women through impact-based litigation, the provision of free legal advice, legal support to advocacy campaigns run by other organisations and training that ensures people know and understand the impact of judgements of the courts on the subject of women’s rights. The WLC also provides legal advice to the other non-governmental women’s organisations nationally and in Africa.

Website: http://www.wlce.co.za/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WLCCapeTown/

Twitter:  @WLCCapeTown

  1. Lawyers for Human Rights (LHR)

LHR was established in 1979 to fight the oppression and abuse of human rights under Apartheid. It later helped the transition to democracy through its voter education and monitoring in 1994. Today it is recognised as being in the forefront of civil society when it comes to strengthening our  democracy. LHR is a human rights NGO whose Gender Equality Programme engages in strategic litigation defending and upholding the rights of women and gender non conforming people. In 2018 LHR acted as a friend of the court in the matter in which the Constitutional Court issued an unanimous judgement that there will be no time limit in which to lay a charge of any sexual offence in South Africa.

Website: http://www.lhr.org.za/about-lawyers-human-rights

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LawyersForHumanRights/

Twitter: @LHR_SA

  1. Sex Workers Education and Advocacy Taskforce (SWEAT)

SWEAT is at the cutting edge of sex worker advocacy, human rights defence and mobilisation in Africa. SWEAT has determined the discussions on a legal adult sex work industry where sex work is acknowledged as work, and where sex workers have a strong voice, which informs and influences wider social debates. SWEAT has campaigned for the decriminalisation of sex work in South Africa through Sisonke, a movement that was formed by sex workers because they were tired of being harassed by police, suffering unsafe and unfair working conditions, abuse from clients, pimps and community members, experiencing problems with access to services like social, health and police and problems with access to banks or opening accounts.

Website: http://www.sweat.org.za/

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/SWEATSA/

Twitter: @SweatTweets

  1. People Opposed to Women Abuse (POWA)

POWA is a feminist women’s rights organisation that provides both services and engages in advocacy in order to ensure the realisation of women rights and thereby improve women’s quality of life. It provides services to survivors of sexual violence and its advocacy uses a feminist and intersectional analysis as the basis for action. Services include frontline services in shelters, counselling, legal advice, media outreach, training and development, and feminist research and knowledge production.

Website: https://www.powa.co.za/POWA/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/powa.berea/

Twitter: @POWA_SA 

  1. Mosaic Women’s Healing and Support Centre

Established in 1993 in response to high levels of violence against women, Mosaic is an organisation that trains women and men from within the communities they serve to offer services aimed at addressing violence against women, domestic violence, sexual violence and improving women’s sexual and reproductive health. It is a community based NGO that focuses on preventing and reducing abuse and domestic violence, particularly for women and youth living in disadvantaged communities. Mosaic has been a strong supporter of the Stop Gender Based Violence Campaign to propose a National Strategic Plan to end gender based violence in South Africa.

Website: http://www.mosaic.org.za

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Mosaicngo

Twitter: @mosaicwcape

  1. Sonke Gender Justice

Sonke’s vision is to have a world in which men, women and children can enjoy equitable, healthy and happy relationships, that contribute to the developments of just and democratic societies. Sonke Gender Justice works across Africa to strengthen government, vicil society and citizen capacity to promote gender equality, prevent domestic and sexual violence and reduce the spread and impact of HIV and Aids.

Website: https://genderjustice.org.za/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SonkeGenderJusticeNGO/

Twitter: @SonkeTogether

  1. Tshwaranang Legal Advocacy Centre (TLAC)

The Tshwaranang Legal Advocacy Centre to end violence against women (Tshwaranang) is a registered NGO that was established in 1996, to promote and defend the rights of women to be free from violence and to have access to quality services. Their work is primarily focused on improving government accountability on policy and legislative reform, the delivery of services and increasing awareness about and access to justice for women and girls affected by violence.

Website: https://www.tlac.org.za/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TshwaranangLegalAdvocacyCentre

Twitter: @endGBV 

  1. Gender Health and Justice Research Unit (GHJRU) UCT

The GHJRU is a research unit of UCT that unites scholars, practitioners and NGO’s to develop and implement innovative, interdisciplinary research and social interventions on social exclusion and violence in a range of social, political and institutional settings. They focus on foundational areas of gender-based violence, sexual and gender minority rights and reproductive rights. They aim to provide well-informed, evidence-based advocacy positions to support legal and policy reform in South Africa and similarly situated countries

Website: http://www.ghjru.uct.ac.za/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ghjruUCT/

  1. Centre for Law and Society (UCT)

The Centre for Law and Society (CLS) is an innovative multi-disciplinary centre in the Faculty of Law where scholars, students and activists engage critically with, and work together on, the challenges facing contemporary South Africa at the intersection of law and society. Through research, critical teaching and robust exchange, CLS aims to shape a new generation of scholars, practitioners and activists, and to build the field of relevant legal theory, scholarship and practice, that is responsive to our context in South Africa and Africa. The CLS Hub provides a supportive space for explosive debates around critical social-legal issues and is a space where students, scholars and activists can creatively engage in critical thinking and writing.

Website: http://www.cls.uct.ac.za/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ClsUct/

Twitter: @ClsUct

  1. Child Witness Institute (UPE)

The Child Witness Institute trains and sensitises stakeholders in the legal system on how to work appropriately and sensitively with child witnesses in court. They identify and address underlying patterns of abuse, violence and victimisation that lead to cases involving children. Through engagement with youth and community groups, intervening where necessary, they educate, inform and help break pervasive cycles of violence, abuse and exploitation. The institute works across borders and nationalities to address ignorance, indifference and insensitivity and thereby create lasting, meaningful change.

Website: http://childwitness.net/contact/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheCWInstitute/

Twitter: @TheCWInstitute 

  1. Centre for Applied Legal Studies (CALS)

The Centre for Applied Legal Studies (CALS) is a civil society organisation based at the School of Law at the University of the Witwatersrand. CALS is also a law clinic, registered with the Law Society of the Northern Provinces, that connects the worlds of academia and social justice. CALS practices human rights law and social justice work with a specific focus on five intersecting programmatic areas, namely Basic Services, Business and Human Rights, Environmental Justice, Gender, and the Rule of Law. It does so in a way which makes creative use of the tools of research, advocacy and litigation, adopts an intersectional and gendered understanding of human rights violations, incorporates other disciplines (such as film and social work) and is conscious of the transformation agenda in South Africa.

Website: https://www.wits.ac.za/cals/

Twitter: @CALS_ZA

  1. The Dullah Omar Institute (UWC)

The Dullah Omar Institute started its work under the name Community Law Centre, an organisation born out of the struggle against Apartheid. The Community Law Centre opened its doors in 1990 under the leadership Dullah Omar and played a major role in the negotiations towards a democratic South Africa. The DOI is a major contributor to policy formulation for South Africa’s constitutional order, and increasingly, elsewhere on the continent. Its Women and Democracy Initiative promotes citizenship and participation and supports other NGOs in making submissions to Parliament with strong focus on inputs to law and policy relating to gender empowerment.

Website: https://dullahomarinstitute.org.za/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CommunityLawCentre/

Twitter: @UWC_DOI 

  1. Greater Nelspruit Rape Intervention Project (GRIP)

GRIP provides confidential, sensitive and comprehensive trauma counselling along with practical assistance and support to help rape, sexual assault and domestic violence survivors successfully obtain necessary health services, prosecute offenders and recover physically, emotionally and mentally with immediate, on-location services in police stations and hospitals, and via extensive in-home post-assault services. It operates in 26 Care Rooms which are situated in 13 police stations, eight hospitals and five courts and maintains constant contact with survivors through home visits and individual one-on-one counselling.

Facebook: https://bit.ly/2PR1U98

Twitter: @info_grip 

  1. LifeLine and ChildLine South Africa

ChildLine in a Non- profit organisation that works to protect children from all forms of violence and create a culture of children’s rights in South Africa. They offer online counselling and telephone counselling for children up to the age of 18, and a toll-free crisis telephone counselling line that deals with hundreds of queries from children and adults. They offer training programmes and recruit volunteers to operate a national helpline line that provides an invaluable educative service, receives calls relating to issues and problems including abuse (physical, emotional, sexual), sexual problems and pregnancy, learning and educational problems, harassment and many more. The ChildLine Toll free number receives approximately 60000 to 90000 calls per month across all the provinces.

Website: http://www.childlinesa.org.za/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ChildlineSA

Twitter: @ChildlineSA

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Women’s Month: A Sham

It’s an annual play and we have all seen it before….

Every year in South Africa, we celebrate Women’s Month to commemorate the thousands of women who fought so bravely for equality during apartheid.

But it has become a month of lip service. Government departments praise their programs to end the scourge of gender based violence and spew dialogue about the initiatives that exist which put the needs of South African women first.

But let’s look at a more accurate test. The importance placed on women’s rights can be measured when a political figure is involved in the act of violating women. Enter, former deputy Minister of Higher Education, Mduduzi Manana.

Mduduzi Manana

Former deputy Higher Education Minister, Mduduzi Manana. CC Image courtesy of Agência Brasil Fotografias on Flickr.

For most of this month, South Africans have been consumed with the story of Manana, after a video was released on social media, showing him beating a young woman as the men around him watched this. He later, in an audio clip, admits he slapped this woman. The media feasts on this story and it makes headlines everywhere.

And then came the grand moment when the ANC Women’s League had the stage to condemn this violence and represent the voice of all women in the country.

And all I can do is sigh as I write this…..

Questions are posed to the ANCWL President,  Bathabile Dlamini, on the Manana incident. An audio interview with the Sunday Times newspaper is published. This is what she says:

“Don’t start from him. If we want to say everyone who occupies a senior position in government we must know his track record because there are people who are worse than him….”

So this makes his actions okay then, because it’s just assault?

“As ANCWL it is our role to fight about issues of gender based violence. I don’t want to be part of those games of saying whether he should resign or not. In other parties there is sexual harassment and it is not treated the way it is treated in the ANC. I refuse that this issue be made a political tool. It is not a political tool….For now we have been saying Umuntu is innocent until proven guilty…”

Dlamini refuses to take a stand on the issue. She has disappointed thousands of South African women yet again. Many of us begin to have flash backs of the Jacob Zuma rape trial and the manner in which Khwezi was vilified.

On the one hand we have Dlamini saying she will not be dragged into this case which directly involves violence against women. On the other hand, you have her preaching that South Africa is ready for a female president as she announces that Nkosazana Dlamini- Zuma will be one of the candidates running for the ANC presidency.

In an address where she announced  Dlamini -Zuma as the candidate backed by ANCWL, she says, “We need to be very vigilant…If people respect us, they must stop doing clandestine things during our month. Every year in parliament, we discuss women’s issues during this month….South African is a patriarchal country even the storyline is meant to use us as weapons or objects.”

Now let’s get back to Manana, who resigns from government.

In his carefully crafted PR statement, he apologises for his actions. “There is no excuse in the world that can justify what I have done and as much as I am utterly and completely shameful of the act, it’s not even about me,” he says.

But Manana’s resignation brings no justice for the woman who was slapped or for South African women who are constantly fighting against violence. It is merely an act, which was as a result of mounting public pressure and because of the impact it would have on the ruling party. Ultimately it was about saving face in a country where politics always takes precedence.

For me it’s just another reminder of how little we value women and their rights in our country. There is no political accountability for the actions of elected officials, from Bathabile Dlamini to Mduduzi Manana and many others.

Something else that gives me sleepless nights is the tendency of political heads to show more concern in Women’s Month. Why is it that if something is committed in this month it is made out to be ten times worse? Beating a woman is a horrific and an unjustifiable crime, whether it happens in January or in August. It shouldn’t be happening. Nor should we leave issues of women to be discussed in this month only.

What was once a month of celebrating women, is now a month for opportunists to express outcry and outrage.

I am glad it’s almost over. Because the truth is that once the month is over people go about and continue to violate the rights of women.

 

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TheJusticeLady

TheJusticeLady is a writer who wants to give a voice to the voiceless. She is an advocate for the rights of rape survivors. She keeps a close eye on the courts, the media and the role they play in shaping the manner in which society sees rape.

Youth for Change.

STOP THE BUS DAY THREE

It’s already 30deg. Celsius this morning the temperature is going to rise everyone is getting ready. Sun hats! check, water bottles! check, sun block cream! check.  It’s off to Rawsonville police station to meet up with Sergeant Hurling Jordan from the crime prevention team. Sergeants Williams and Ferreira accompanied her to join the team to do door to door on the farms.

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Speaking to ladies in town.

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DSCN0871 DSCN0875 DSCN0897 DSCN0908 DSCN0975 While waiting on the sergeants the team took the opportunity and gave out pamphlets to passersby and also dropped  off some Rape crisis booklet at the police station.

The first farm Gabriere then it was Merwede. All the farm workers have return to work after the strike. The people who were at home received us well and invited us into their homes. They felt free to ask questions around rape and all types of abuse. The team also gave out pamphlets with the Rape Crisis contact numbers.

You would never had said that there was unrest in this area until the bus pulled off at the side of the road. Vineyards  were set alight on Tuesday during the strike.

Then it was door to door in Da Nova an Informal Settlement in Rawsonville. People in this area claim that they have no rape, domestic violence and abuse, but while others say there is.This community was encouraged to report crime and to break the silence.

The team has to do an interview at slot at 12pm  Valley fm Radio.The Topics were Myths, how to support a survivor.   Shaamiela, Tuthu and Thobeke explained what the survivor has to go through if there is no support for her.This talk was done in Xhosa, Afrikaans and English.Listeners  were encourage to support the survivors and not to protect the perpetrators. DSCN0981The team  left for  Zwelethemba a community just outside Worcester. The leader of this youth group a lady social worker named Thembeka, invited Rape Crisis. There were 27 youth, ages 14-20 years.The youth does outreach in this area and is involved in many projects.  This group Zwakala Youth for Christ engaged in the talk ask questions and showed much interest. They wanted to know why survivors feel emotional at court, when are survivors ready to testify, can men be rape, when to disclose and when is it a gang rape, these are the type of questions the group asked.The two facilitators Evelynne and Tuthu answered all their questions and  addressed all their concerns, they were also encouraged to network with other Organisations.

It’s 5pm the team is off to our accomadation to debrief and to pack for the next day.

Rape Crisis Cape Town Trust wishes to thank our donor Department of Social Development (DSD)  that made Stop the Bus 2012 possible.  Department of Social Development Provincial Logo

Slut Walk Joburg – speeches and footage